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. so it does raise the question, this has been a miserable failure so what do we do? maybe just de-criminalize marijuana or some other stuff so we can use those resources, as you say, to educate people. kids going after drugs, it's been going on for decades. they're using stronger drugs, getting more damaged. what about kids who are using pills from their parents' prescription cabinets? that's an equally large epidemic. we're not spending enough time getting at the root of the problem, the breakdown of the family, the breakdown of society. all these things out there. >> something that you're missing, what is it? it would free up the police to use these resources to go after violent crime. the amount of money we're putting into it. >> they're spending a lot of time arresting people for petty drugs and also filling up prison space. >> eleanor. >> one of the reasons you're finding drugs in suburbs is because it it's harder to get oxycontin, and twhrafs other one? we were talking about. the prescription drugs. >> vicodin. >> it's even hard to get -- >> what's wrong with vicodin? >> it'
of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the original tea party and tea party movement were about. far from being patriots, the original tea partyers were smugglers. some of them, among the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy
like ours. ours was a months monthlong and it was miserable. i came out of that a changed human being, for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness and quite a few tailfeathers and spent the next decade being a weapons and tactics officer at a different level than a fighter wing. i was in khobar towers when that blew up. do you guys remember that? always in the wrong place at the wrong time. i was there when that place blew up. we hadn't really, i don't think any of us was thinking about terrorism the way that is thought about now. it wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared to fight the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rou
so miserable that they quit or they get them fired. you would have ones in every so often that would say something like that, reach out in some humane sort of way as one person to another, that they didn't last very long. >> you write about being in prison and your expensive there, and the trial and all of this going on that's been heaped upon you. and jesse and jason, and yet you sit here tonight and you see people standing in line who are crying as they are asking you questions. because they are so appreciative of you being here, and also have so much empathy for you. you feel like india sort of score of your life you have at this point way more love than sort of hatred come your way? >> yeah. i think the hatred was probably at one point more widespread, but even in the times whenever the world hated me, whenever they were trying to murder me, there was still this really, really deep bottomless pool of love in different sources that kept me going. so i think really whenever you start putting it on scales and weigh me, i think the love that i've been given in my life far outweighs t
of the south. they would make a miserable addition to any portion of the population of the united states. to another friend he wrote a week later that the only difference between the peons of mexico and slaves of the south is their color. he sent us for making these peons voters and citizens of the united states, it should not be thought of until we give out news about. so these are hardened thoughts on what's happening in mexico. the transformation occurred after only three months in mexico. he told the third friend, he said, although i was for annexing of the mexico before he came here, yet i now doubt whether it's worth it. so much for mexico's people are not better than the country. harden's evolution from this expansion is introducing a phobic cynic of the war was a rapid one, but it wasn't uncommon. hardin's views are shared by many in the army. like i said, midwesterner so do most of the csm for the war with mexico's, but many decided it wasn't such a great idea after all. their exposure of the land led them to question the future of manifest destiny and frankly commanders were no
a person who commits suicide and then homicide-suicide, not only are they so miserable this they are ready to die, but they feel that they need to get some sense of vengeance by killing other people and taking them with them. now, i know you want to predict and look around, parents want to see in their kids. you can't do that. it's really literally impossible to identify mass murderers in advance. what we can tell and parents can tell when their kids need assistance and need help and cowbell couns counseling, but can't predict they are going to be mass murderers. >> for more now and the new details involving the massacre, let's go straight to nbc's jay gray who is standing by in newtown. jay, what more can you tell us? >> reporter: well, craig, i think what you've said is very true, and what everybody has been talking about here, but i think it's important to point out there's been so much misinformation involved with this case that we're finally beginning to learn some of the very basic specifics here. we know that the accused gunman, adam lanza, did carry not only a semiautomatic weapon
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6